amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Jacques Derrida, born 15 July 1930, died 9 October 2004
Seven Quotes
I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.
No one gets angry at a mathematician or a physicist whom he or she doesn’t understand, or at someone who speaks a foreign language, but rather at someone who tampers with your own language.
What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written.
But psychoanalysis has taught that the dead—a dead parent, for example—can be more alive for us, more powerful, more scary, than the living. It is the question of ghosts.
I always dream of a pen that would be a syringe.
The traditional statement about language is that it is in itself living, and that writing is the dead part of language.
Learning to live ought to mean learning to die - to acknowledge, to accept, an absolute mortality - without positive outcome, or resurrection, or redemption, for oneself or for anyone else. That has been the old philosophical injunction since Plato: to be a philosopher is to learn how to die.
Derrida was a French philosopher who published more than 40 books, as well as hundreds of essays. He is best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction. He is one of the major figures associated with post-modern philosophy.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Jacques Derrida, born 15 July 1930, died 9 October 2004

Seven Quotes

  1. I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.
  2. No one gets angry at a mathematician or a physicist whom he or she doesn’t understand, or at someone who speaks a foreign language, but rather at someone who tampers with your own language.
  3. What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written.
  4. But psychoanalysis has taught that the dead—a dead parent, for example—can be more alive for us, more powerful, more scary, than the living. It is the question of ghosts.
  5. I always dream of a pen that would be a syringe.
  6. The traditional statement about language is that it is in itself living, and that writing is the dead part of language.
  7. Learning to live ought to mean learning to die - to acknowledge, to accept, an absolute mortality - without positive outcome, or resurrection, or redemption, for oneself or for anyone else. That has been the old philosophical injunction since Plato: to be a philosopher is to learn how to die.

Derrida was a French philosopher who published more than 40 books, as well as hundreds of essays. He is best known for developing a form of semiotic analysis known as deconstruction. He is one of the major figures associated with post-modern philosophy.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

(via techbot)


pieto:

Walter Benjamin’s library card, Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1940.
The greater the shock factor in particular impressions, the more vigilant consciousness has to be in screening stimuli; the more efficiently it does so, the less these impressions enter long experience [Erfahrung] and the more they correspond to the concept of isolated experience [Erlebnis]. Perhaps the special achievement of shock defense is the way it assigns an incident a precise point in time in consciousness, at the cost of the integrity of the inci­dent’s contents. This would be a peak achievement of the intellect; it would turn the incident into an isolated experience. Without reflection, there would be nothing but the sudden start, occasionally pleasant but usually distasteful, which, according to Freud, confirms the failure of the shock de­fense. Baudelaire has portrayed this process in a harsh image. He speaks of a duel in which the artist, just before being beaten, screams in fright. This duel is the creative process itself. Thus, Baudelaire placed shock experience [Chockerfahrung] at the very center of his art. This self-portrait, which is corroborated by evidence from several contemporaries, is of great signifi­cance. Since Baudelaire was himself vulnerable to being frightened, it was not unusual for him to evoke fright. Valles tells us about his eccentric gri­maces; on the basis of a portrait by Nargeot, Pontmartin establishes Baude­laire’s alarming appearance; Claudel stresses the cutting quality he could give to his utterances; Gautier speaks of the italicizing Baudelaire indulged in when reciting poetry; Nadar describes his jerky gait.
from On Some Motifs in Baudelaire - Walter Benjamin

pieto:

Walter Benjamin’s library card, Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, 1940.

The greater the shock factor in particular impressions, the more vigilant consciousness has to be in screening stimuli; the more efficiently it does so, the less these impressions enter long experience [Erfahrung] and the more they correspond to the concept of isolated experience [Erlebnis]. Perhaps the special achievement of shock defense is the way it assigns an incident a precise point in time in consciousness, at the cost of the integrity of the inci­dent’s contents. This would be a peak achievement of the intellect; it would turn the incident into an isolated experience. Without reflection, there would be nothing but the sudden start, occasionally pleasant but usually distasteful, which, according to Freud, confirms the failure of the shock de­fense. Baudelaire has portrayed this process in a harsh image. He speaks of a duel in which the artist, just before being beaten, screams in fright. This duel is the creative process itself. Thus, Baudelaire placed shock experience [Chockerfahrung] at the very center of his art. This self-portrait, which is corroborated by evidence from several contemporaries, is of great signifi­cance. Since Baudelaire was himself vulnerable to being frightened, it was not unusual for him to evoke fright. Valles tells us about his eccentric gri­maces; on the basis of a portrait by Nargeot, Pontmartin establishes Baude­laire’s alarming appearance; Claudel stresses the cutting quality he could give to his utterances; Gautier speaks of the italicizing Baudelaire indulged in when reciting poetry; Nadar describes his jerky gait.

from On Some Motifs in Baudelaire - Walter Benjamin




A Thousand Plateaus: Drawings

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